Becoming an Animated Character!! (via AccessAble & Community Health Partnerships)

If you follow me on social media, then you will know that I have been teasing a secret project for a little while now...


And today is the big reveal!


I am so excited to be involved in the launch of AccessAble and Community Health Partnerships (CHP) new accessibility guides.

CHP - who own 5% of the NHS property portfolio - have collaborated with AccessAble to create detailed access guides for each of their 310 sites across England.


For those like me living in Cornwall, this includes venues such as:

Truro Health Park

Praze-an-Beeble Surgery, Camborne.

The Clays Surgery, Roche.

Oak Tree Surgery, Liskeard


And many more locations across Devon and the Southwest.


The Animation


To make this launch even more exciting, a series of short stop-motion videos were created by production company Surfr. These videos focus on the barriers that many disabled people face when trying to access healthcare venues.


3 videos have been produced in total, sharing the experiences of 6 individuals with various disabilities - from visual impairments to mobility needs.


The team have done an amazing job at creating our characters, and I've loved watching them come to life over the past few months.

The amount of work that went into this project is truly incredible - from capturing our voices, to making our clothes and acting out certain mannerisms - this is disability representation at it's very best!


I feel honoured to be involved in this campaign, as it highlights the real-life experiences that disabled people face when accessing healthcare venues.


And let's be honest, who doesn't want to become an animated character?! What an opportunity... Wallace & Gromit eat your heart out.


If you'd like to see the stories of my fellow animated friends, you can click here.

A collage showing all 6 animation characters: Ross Lannon, Sassy Wyatt, Ed Rex, Fi Anderson, Natalie Gardner and Tanvi Vyas

What is an "Access Guide"?


An access guide provides detailed information about venue facilities, giving peace of mind for those who are maybe a bit anxious about travelling to a new location. These guides are 100% facts and photographs, covering a range of different disability needs - all found via the AccessAble app / website.

Screenshot from the AccessAble website showing 5 accessibility symbols - such as level access, hearing systems, sign language and assistance dogs

Upon arrival at the building, these guides provide in-depth information on doorway widths, hearing loop systems, accessible toilets, parking and so much more.


As you all know, accessibility and inclusion is something I am very passionate about, hence why I am so proud to be involved with this project.

 

Disclaimer:

This project is in paid partnership with AccessAble. As always, my comments are honest and entirely my own.